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Detail

Christmas Cake

  • 6
  • 2 hr
  • 30 min
  • 3 hr
  • Expert

Génoise cake for a springform pan of 16cm diameter

  • 3 eggs
  • 90g sugar
  • 90g flour
  • 1 pinch of salt

To coat the pan

  • Melted butter
  • Flour

Soaking syrup

  • 15g sugar
  • 50g orange juice
  • Water
  • Grand Marnier to your taste

Dark chocolate ganache

  • 190g cream
  • 30g milk
  • 300g dark chocolate 63%75g butter on room temperature

Chocolate icing

  • 10cl milk
  • 100g dark chocolate
  • 8g liquid glucose *
  • 8g butter

Recipe:

Butter the pan with a basting brush, add a little flour and spread it on all the sides of the pan. Turn the pan over and tap to remove the excess.

Prepare a bain-marie in a large saucepan and boil the water to about 80°C (there are some small bubbles at the bottom of the saucepan). Preheat oven to 180°

Break the eggs in “cul de poule”, a round-bottomed inox bowl, add sugar and mix IMMEDIATELY using a whisk. Whip and whiten quickly the mixture.

Put the “cul de poule” in the bain-marie and whip until the mixture doubles in volume (approximately) and especially so that the mixture’s temperature reaches between 40°C and 45°C.

Outside of the bain-marie, whip the mixture until complete cooling and obtaining a ribbon (approximately 10min). The dough should fall from whip to form a “ribbon” with a footprint remaining a few moments on the surface of the device.

From a height, sieve your flour and mix gradually and delicately using a spatula to avoid making fall down the mixture.

Pour the génoise dough in the middle of the pan and let it spread itself. Smooth the surface.

Cook at 180° during 20 to 25 min. Check the cooking of the génoise by planting a knife, the blade should come out clean, with very few traces of moisture. Pass a blade of knife between the génoise and the sides of the pan if necessary, and let cool on a pastry rack.

Keep wet in a clean kitchen towel if necessary.

Yule log version: to do the same cake in a Yule log size, just cook the génoise on a large rectangular baking tray covered by parchment paper
It is important not to let the génoise cook more than necessary and not to let it dry. It has to remain moist not to crack when you will be rolling it.
Leave the génoise to stand for 2 or 3 minutes right out of the oven, sprinkle the surface with icing sugar, then turn over the génoise on a clean parchment paper placed on a kitchen towel.

Remove delicately the parchment paper and, starting along the edge of one of the long sides of the cake, roll up immediately the biscuit, using the clean parchment paper and the kitchen towel to help you. Keep tight in the first roll. When the génoise is completely rolled, constrict well the extremities of the towel to keep the form and keep the génoise wrapped, edges under.

Raw peeled oranges 4 oranges
Using a sharp knife cut off the peel and white pith of oranges (cut skin and white skin) to keep only fruits nets.

Keep the pulp to make the soaking syrup by squeezing it through a sieve.

Soaking syrup
15g sugar
50g orange juice
Water
Grand Marnier to your taste

Put everything in a saucepan, boil briefly up, remove from heat and leave to cool.

Dark chocolate ganache
190g cream
30g milk
300g dark chocolate 63%
75g butter on room temperature

Chop the dark chocolate and put it in a “cul de poule”. Boil up milk and cream in a small saucepan and pour immediately on the chocolate. Mix gently with a spatula.

When all the chocolate is melted, leave to stand for 2 or 3 min and add softened butter in small pieces, incorporating progressively.

Finally end up whipping the ganache to get a smooth and homogeneous texture. Cover with cling film as soon as complete cooling and keep cool without allowing setting.

Chocolate icing
10cl milk
100g dark chocolate
8g liquid glucose *
8g butter

* Glucose syrup takes the form of thick, colourless and transparent syrup. It is a pure glucose made of corn starch or potato starch. It is NOT a mixture of sugar and water, but a preparation found in specialty stores or in the pastry cook.

Chop the dark chocolate and put it in a “cul-de-poule”. Boil up milk and cream in a small saucepan and pour immediately on the chocolate. Mix gently with a spatula.

When all the chocolate is melted, add butter and glucose incorporating progressively. Put a cling film and keep cool. If the icing sets, warm it IN THE BAIN-MARIE before use.

Cake assembly version:
Using a long knife with strong teeth gently cut the génoise in 3 slices of equal thickness (even better with a meat slicer).
Keep some ganache for the next step. In a cake plate covered with parchment paper, assembly the cake using an entremet ring (of variable size, otherwise use the springform pan used for baking the génoise). Place a slice of génoise, soak it with a brush with a little syrup, add the pieces of orange, a thin layer of chocolate ganache (whipp it slighty to slacken it), then coat with the second slice of génoise, repeat the operation with oranges and ganache, then end with the last slice, soaked side below. Put in the fridge during 1h30 so that the ganache sets.

Remove from the fridge; pass a blade of knife between the pan and the cake, then remove the ring. Coat the edges with the rest (1/4) of the remaining ganache, well smoothing with a spatula. Put it back in the fridge during 20min.

End with the icing (if necessary, warm it in the bain-marie) and smooth all with spatula. Put in the fridge during 2h to allow setting.

Remove the cake 30min-1h before serving to make the ganache and icing raise in temperature and be less hard (more difficult to cut slices, however). Decorate at THE LAST MOMENT with icing sugar and sugar decorations.

Yule log version:
Unroll delicately the génoise on the worktop without removing the kitchen towel and the parchment paper surrounding it.

Soak the génoise well with the syrup, on its entire surface, using basting brush. Whip the ganache to give it back a creamy consistency and spread it regularly with the metallic spatula on the entire génoise surface.

Roll tightly the filled génoise using the parchment paper again to guide (be careful this time to withdraw it when rolling!!). Join cling film and refrigerate with the edges below, at least 1h before final assembly, to allow the ganache to solidify a little.

End with the icing (if necessary, warm it in the bain-marie) and smooth all with spatula. Put in the fridge during 2h to allow setting.

Remove the cake 30min-1h before serving to make the ganache and icing raise in temperature and be less hard (more difficult to cut slices, however). Decorate at THE LAST MOMENT with icing sugar and sugar decorations.
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